About the Chronicle of Higher Education

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Biography Guide

Biography is a constantly updated website where you can access thousands of biographies of people old and new that are exclusive and are fact checked. They also provide citation information at the bottom of each biography.

 

You can find it on Curry Library’s website by clicking on “Databases.”

 

First, click on people from the menu and use the search bar for the person you would like the biography on.

 

Biographies, videos, groups of articles, and related searches will appear.

 

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If you want a readable biography:

 

Select the biography that you would like, for example, the far right in the picture up above.

 

It will then take you to a page with quick facts,  pictures, related videos, a summary, and the full article.

 

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If you wish to view an informational video: Click on the image with the label “video.”

 

It will then show you the media player with that video loaded and ready for viewing, but will also show you a playlist of all videos that are in a playlist to the right that are related to the searched topic.

 

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Biography doesn’t have to just be for historical figures. They provide videos, biographies, and articles on celebrities, articles on recent history, and crime.

 

Biography is a great tool to use for research projects for history or political science majors if you’re looking for reliable information you can confidently cite about a person that is key in your topic, such as in the given example, you could cite about Mao when discussing the Chinese Revolution or the Chinese Cultural Revolution and the role he plays.

Congressional Record Guide

Congressional Record is a great government database if you need access to daily court proceedings and debates all the way back to 1994. You can find this on Curry Library’s website by clicking on “Databases.”

 

If you’re interested in the proceedings on the current day, the link to the pdf is right before the yearly links.

 

 

If you’re looking for a specific date, click on the year. It will then break down to months. Then click on the month, and then day. You’re given the options of the Daily Digest, Extensions of Remarks, House proceedings, and Senate proceedings.

 

Click on what you’re needing to discover. That section will expand and break down into different sections where you can then download a pdf or read the text online.

 


 

In the example, President Clinton wrote to Congress that he wanted to extend the date of the state of national emergency due to Cuba attacking two American airplanes one year prior. But, throughout the Daily Digest, congressmen debate whether or not the budget could handle it, as it wasn’t balanced (or children’s healthcare, the biggest topic on the floor) nor had he attempted to fix the deficit--in fact he extended it for another three years. If you were studying or researching the US’ relations with Cuba, or President Clinton, this could clue you in on Americans concerns with his policies as a primary resource.

 

This is a great resource to get information on passed laws, debates and insight on how the proceedings in Congress are performed.

Opposing Viewpoints in Context Guide

Opposing Viewpoints in Context is a database that allows you to see multiple sides of issues that are current or in the past with access to tons of related source as well as a basic summary of the topic. This database is great for history and political science majors, as well as debate! You can find it on Curry Library’s website by clicking on “Databases.”

 

Begin by typing the topic in the search bar. A page will come up with a summary, viewpoints, journals, statistics, primary sources, audio, newspapers, images, videos, references, biographies, magazines,interactive  maps, and websites based on your topic: which are linked to jump to a specific type of source on the right.

 

 

When you click on viewpoints, the database gives you the full article as well as options to cite, email, download, save, print, share, and translate it. You can even listen to it if you wish.

 

 

Another neat option is the ability to highlight and make notes on the article as you read, which are kept track in the previously highlighted “Tools” section in the picture above. Simply highlight by holding the left mouse button down and selecting which you would like to keep highlighted as you read the article or to make notes on, and click highlight/notes.

 

 

In the given example, there are hundreds of articles that explain why or why not capital punishment should exist--religion, race, mental illness, economics, human rights, constitutionality, effectiveness, and what crimes should or should not be considered. This database gives every possible angle you can think of and as many reasons as possible for or against it.

 

Opposing Viewpoints is great for collecting information for a research paper, to inform yourself on political issues, or back up/refute your own or other’s stances in debate!


 

Science.gov Guide

Science.gov

 

Science.gov is a gateway to government science information and research results. It provides a lot of news, information, journals, and articles. You can find it on Curry Library’s website.

 

The homepage instantly gives you an array of information. You can easily start navigating with the search bar!

 

 

Once you’ve searched your topic, you’ll see your results and an easy way to refine your search on the left hand column.

 

 

One of Science.gov’s most useful tools is its ability to save your articles. If you check the box beside your article, it will be saved in a folder on the website! Use the trash can icon to deselect all of your articles.

 

 

To get even more specific with your search, you can go back to the homepage and select “Advanced Search.”

 

 

Using this feature will allow you to type in a topic, title, and author, and it can narrow your search by date and/or category.

 

 

Being back on the homepage also leads you to Science.gov’s other numerous resources and helpful links, like additional websites, news, and opportunities for students!

 

 

If you want a broader search and to see all the topics Science.gov has to offer, you can also click on Index for a full list. This can be a great starting point for research if you haven’t chosen a topic and don’t know where to start.

 

 

All these functions make Science.gov a great way for students to access government science information and resources.

THOMAS Guide

Thomas (Congress.gov)

 

THOMAS is provided by the United States Library of Congress in order to make federal legislative information freely available to the public. It is updated several times each day, and it allows access to information on bills and resolutions, congressional records, presidential nominations, treaties, committee reports, and other government resources. You can find it on Curry Library’s website.

 

THOMAS’ homepage instantly offers an array of information. They provide livestream links to House and Senate activity, daily news, and easy search options.

 

 

THOMAS is very thorough in their search options. The search bar alone allows you to choose what you’re looking for with a drop down menu.

 

 

They also offer relevant Bills for easy access below the search bar.

 

 

Once using the search bar, ways to narrow and customize your search become even more thorough with all kinds of sorters on the left hand side and a drop down menu on the top.

 

At first glance, the articles contain a lot of information. They provide you with information about the bills, like the committees behind it and the latest actions. They even provide you with a tracking device to see where the bill has passed.

 

 

Once clicking on a bill, you’ll be able to access more information about the bill and the subject.

 

 

THOMAS is a great and efficient tool to use when sifting through current and old bills and is an easy website to help keep yourself up-to-date! You can access raw data, voting records, track bills as they change, and find related bills and information to further your research.

America: History & Life Guide

EBSCOhost is a very easy database to use. It is especially helpful in that it offers a variety of subjects. For American history help, EBSCOhost offers “America: History & Life.”

 

This version of EBSCO’s database works in the same, accessible and simple manner as all the other versions. You can find it on Curry Library’s website by clicking on “Databases.”

 

Once there, use the search bar to start, and you’ll soon see a wide variety of information available to you.

 

 

A simple search of “civil war” has brought up over 8,000 articles. A quick and easy way to narrow your search is to take a look at the left hand column, where you can filter your results by different types.

 

 

Changing my search to “Peer Reviewed” and “Academic journals only has narrowed my results significantly. You can narrow results even more by changing the Publication Dates (to find recent or older articles) and by changing your search phrase.

 

The unique aspect of this version of EBSCOhost is at the top of the page. There you can find an organized chronology of history.

 

 

This function can help guide you if your history gets a little out of order and is a very useful tool that divides its information by time period and geographic location!

 

 

Clicking on Chronology of Events will give date-to-date occurrences of this particular historical event (in this case, The Colonization of America). Clicking on different nations gives brief overviews of each country’s part. It also provides a few relevant thinking topics to help brainstorm and provides links to help further your research in specific areas!

 

 

EBSCOhost is great for historical research and finding scholarly essays and articles as well as assisting in keeping the years of American history in order!

Naxos Music Library Guide

Naxos Music Library is a database that holds a massive collection of musical recordings that is completely free to all William Jewell students. You could also use Youtube which is also free to use, but does not give you completely factual information about composers, their music, and genres/music periods.

 

Naxos also has a mobile app that you can download from the App Store or GooglePlay so you can listen anywhere on the go!

 

You can find it on Curry Library’s website by clicking on “Databases.”

 

Once there, use the search bar to start, and you’ll soon see a wide variety of information available to you. Looking up “Mozart” brings up thousands of individual recordings of his music, so make sure you’re as specific as possible.



 


 

An easy way to limit your sources is to click the “Advanced Search” button at the top right-hand corner of the page, as highlighted above.

 

Once clicked, click advanced search, the third tab.

 

 

Then, once clicked, you can insert specific information to narrow results.

 

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Click on desired result, and then click which piece you would like to listen to. This will cause a checkmark(s) to appear.

 

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Then click “Play Selections” on the left.

 


 

Once selected, a media player will open and you can listen!

 

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Another cool feature is Naxos’ guided tours through different music eras! It’s great if you want a short summary of specific composers and styles that are important during the time period! It even gives you recommended listening examples!

 

Select “Guided Tours” from the menu at the top of the page and select which era you want to explore from the drop down menu, and click through the different composers!


 

 

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Lastly, another tool at your disposal is the study area, which can be found at the top of the page

 

 

Options of different areas of the world appear in a drop-down menu. In these different sections, you can check out different music programs from other countries and their own requirements of what students should know--this can provide you a way to study or a self-check to make sure you’re where you should be in your studies!

 

You can take these facts to put in your paper/project to solidify in introductory paragraph about an era or you can take the biographies of composers to show their influence/importance.

 

Naxos Music Library is a great way to freshen up on music history, study for listening exams, or explore new music!

ProQuest Music Guide

ProQuest Music Database is simple to navigate if you’ve used any other ProQuest Database such as ProQuest Health Management. You can use ProQuest Music to access thousands of reliable music journals and articles. Both of these can be found on Curry Library’s website by clicking on “Databases.”

 

You’ll see the homepage of the database. There are a couple options to go forward.

 

You can simply enter in keywords for the subject that you would like to search, or you could slim down the amount of sources to come up in the search to find something you are looking for in a few ways.

 

 

You can click the advanced search button under the name of the database to input specifics (e.g., author, date published, type of source, language, country, etc.) or click whether or not you would like peer reviewed, scholarly journals, or if you would like to exclude reviews of musical pieces in your search.

 

Once you make your search, you can look through the sources that come up and click on one that seems useful. You can read the full article there as well as get a synopsis. On the right, you can download a pdf, save, print, create a citation, and email the article.

 

 

If you want to cite, click on the link and a window will pop up like this:

 

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Select the citation style and choose the one that is instructed by your professor and click change. Then, copy and paste the citation into your paper.

 

A nice resource is the “Browse” tab at the top of the page.

 

 

It’ll take you to a page where you have access to a musical glossary, opera synopses, fundamental music terms, and pronunciation guides.

 

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This database is great for research papers/projects of all genres of music. Another good reference for music exploration is Naxos Music Library, which can be also found on the Curry Library Online Database page. The biggest difference is that you cannot listen to music on ProQuest Music, but ProQuest does have more detailed and more expansive periodical selection. This database is best for text research.

Bartleby Guide

Bartleby is a great place to access free web books and information. The website provides full access to works by classic authors and to scholarly information and literature, and it can easily be found on Curry Library’s website with the other databases.

 

The first page immediately offers you it’s Featured Authors, popular authors often used in English classes and scholarly research.

 

 

Clicking on any of these authors leads you to biographical information about the author as well as their works.

 

 

Harvard Classics are also on the Homepage; this link leads you to a digital anthology produced by Harvard.

 

 

The anthology contains a broad array of works by authors, philosopher’s, religious and historical figures, etc.

 

 

If you know what you’re looking for, you can use the search bar and search the author and/or the title of the work. The drop down menu beside it can help refine your search results.

 

 

There’s also the option to view works by subject using the tab near the top of the page. This categorizes the materials into areas such as English, Religion & Mythology, Anthologies, etc.

 

 

Other tabs at the top of the page allow you to browse by verse, fiction, and non-fiction.

 


 

Browsing by author and title is also an option should you just be casually searching.

 

 

No matter how you use it, Bartleby is a great resource for research and intellectual enlightenment, and it provides a wide array of material through which you can sort!

Literature Online Guide

Literature Online

 

Literature Online provides students with an array of literature, critical theory, full-text journals, and author biographies. It is a great tool to use in English and literature courses and can easily be found on Curry Library’s website!

 

The first page of the website offers a lot of different ways to search. The top tabs clearly categorizes its materials, while the search bar offers a quick search option.

 

 

Using the search bar is efficient, and Literature Online makes it easy to filter your results to items more relevant to what you need! Upon your first search, the left hand column appears as a search aid.

 

 

After searching “Herman Melville,” my results obviously include a significant amount of poetry and criticism, as well as prose and other helpful articles. Clicking on the “Criticism” tab will help me focus my search on critical theory and will take me to this page:

 

 

The sources title “Abell” require an account registration. Additionally, Literature Online provides a lot of sources that don’t require an account registration as well, making research very convenient!

 

Clicking on non-Abell sources will lead to a page with citation information, an abstract, and the full text.

 

Literature Online offers various options to save your articles. Saving the article to your archive also requires an account registration. There are also a lot of quick and easy alternatives to making an account, such as exporting and saving the article as PDF, acquiring the link to the page, and adding it to your “selected items.”

 

 

You can also see the easy citation button, which will make the citation of the article for you. The citation function includes MLA, a common form of citation in literature papers!

 

Saving the article to your “selected items” will save the article on the website, and a link to them can be found on the top of the page.

 

 

Your selected items can also be sorted, so you can find specific articles with ease!

 

 

Other handy tools from Literature Online can be found on the top of the page. The different tabs clearly separate the sources by authors, texts (poetry, prose, etc), criticism, and so on. The critical theory is conveniently separated by Abell and other full-text journals for your convenience!

 

 

The Reference tab also contains a lot of useful information, like bibliographies, biographies, and study guides.

 

 

Overall, Literature Online provides a lot of useful literature and criticism to go with it for those analysis-heavy English classes!

Euromonitor Passport Guide

Euromonitor Passport is extremely useful for research in business. As its website states, this database features millions of statistics and in-depth reports on 27 industries with demographic, macro and socioeconomic data, and analysis on consumers and economies in 210 countries worldwide.

 

Upon accessing the database (easily found on Curry Library’s website), the first page you are met with is the Terms and Conditions. Simply scroll down and accept them to access the rest of the website.

 

At first glance, Euromonitor’s website clearly displays its diverse search tools: statistics, analysis, and “dashboards.” Each of these devices can be used to search for specific information (with the ability to divide by industry, economies and consumer, topic, etc) and to assist in understanding the business world.


 

 

To begin your search, you can either use the three tools listed above, or you can turn to the tabs at the top of the page that divide search into business type: industries, economies, consumers, and companies. Each of these tabs offers a drop down menu that will further narrow your search:

 

 

With the tabs at the top, you can select one of these items and customize your search based on geography, consumer reports, company production, etc:

 

 

You can choose what kind of results you receive depending on which type of search you use. Broader search results can be found in “Search Tree.” Analysis reports can be found under “Analysis Finder.” The other searches can be divided by product, country, etc:

 

 

The “Rank” options will offer ranked spreadsheets (customized depending on which functions you select, like ranking by size or growth) with access to more information:

 

 

Click on the color coded links at the side for more information!

 

 

Using the Analysis Finder will allow you to find articles depending on your search (All Analysis, Latest Analysis, Articles and Opinions, etc):

 

 

The Search Tree is the more broad function of these, and it allows you to search for information depending on your specific categories and geographies:

 

 

It then offers statistics and analysis that can be useful for statistical background knowledge or as evidence in a paper:

 

 

As you can see, Euromonitor Passport is a very thorough and diverse database for business projects and research!

Medline Plus Guide

Medline Plus


MedlinePlus is the National Institutes of Health’s Web site. It offers information about diseases, conditions, and wellness in different forms such as articles, journals, illustrations, and videos. The offered information ranges from the latest treatments to word definitions to specific drug supplements.

 

You can find the database’s website on Curry Library’s website. The first page instantly offers an array of information such as health topics, drugs & supplements, and videos & tools:

 

 

Clicking on Health Topics will lead you to a diverse list of information:

 

 

Clicking on any of these items will give you a brief overview of the subject with an additional list of links that will lead you to more specific information.

 

 

Clicking on the options on the right will lead you to scroll boxes with numerous other medical conditions that you can read about:

 

 

Each option leads you to even more specific pages about each condition. You can find basic information from the basic link and summary, and for research papers or other assignments, you can find links and resources for more, in-depth information!

 

 

There’s also a medical encyclopedia to help you learn about important terms regarding each topic and related topics for further, more expansive research.

 

 

A great search option on some of these pages includes a “Living With” option that will lead you to sources that can help you relate to a patient and help explain what a patient might expect in daily life or in recovery.

 

 

 

The Drugs & Supplements page offers a wide range of information on drugs, herbs, and supplements, and the information can be divided by type and name for easy searching.

 

 

You can select a letter if you are sure of what you are looking for, or click “All herbs and supplements” for the full list. Upon doing so, you will find each drug by name, and clicking on any name will lead you to its information page. These drug information pages offer a wide array of knowledge about specific drugs, herbs, or supplements, including pronunciation, why they are prescribed, side effects, precautions, etc:

 

 



 

The Video & Tools option is great to use for studying, as it offers lots of information and even games and quizzes!

 

 

The videos range from operations and surgeries to observations of the body, anatomy, and diseases. Other tools provide basic teachings of medical words and health information, found in the right column.

 

Back on the homepage, Medline’s website offers even more useful tools and information. Scrolling down reveals that the website offers current health news and other access to helpful information.

 

 

The Encyclopedia is a great place for even more information.

 

 

Some of these pages include even more information not directly related to those in the medical field (for example, “Baby supplies you need”). The encyclopedia shows just how thorough this database can be!

 

 

The Easy-to-Read Materials will lead you to a lot of information in the form of pdfs, which you can save and keep for free!

 

 

The other tools at the bottom of the homepage lead you to medical information and organizations around the world.

 

With all the tools and access to information offered, Medline Plus is a great database for an array of medical information. It is more thorough and reliable than WebMD, and it offers a lot of great, scholarly sources for research purposes!

Micromedex Guide

Micromedex

 

Micromedex is an informational database found on Curry Library’s website. It provides information regarding different drugs and diseases, proper drug uses/dosages, and disease treatments. It is a great informant when making healthcare decisions!

 


 

 

The first page of the website offers a search bar and various clickable items. The options at the bottom of the page offer lots of resources to help keep you up to date on news, citations, and general information.

 

With the search bar you can get different results depending on what you search and how. Searching a simple disease will result in basic information regarding its symptoms, history, treatment, etc.

 

 

The Reference tab on the left hand side is additionally a great tool to find articles related to the topic you searched!

 

 

Searching for more diverse diseases will result in more results and different options that will help narrow and focus your search. Use the filter options on the left hand side to help refine your results, or rephrase your search input!

 

 

Clicking on different diseases (for example, “Malignant tumor of thyroid gland”) will result in treatment guidance, discussing necessary treatments and methods of diagnosis.

 

 

Scrolling down will reveal the other offered resources, such as links to relevant information, articles, and the references used.

 

 

If you search a disease in search of drug information, refine your search by clicking on “Drugs” on the left hand side.

 

 

Doing so will lead you to the list of drugs used to treat different kinds of the disease you searched. Clicking on any of the options will lead you to an informational page. This page contains a lot of useful information, like proper dosage of the drug, drug safety, dosage depending on the patient’s state of being and age, etc. There are also related topics on the right hand side to further your research if need be.

 

 

 

With all the different ways to search and access information, Micromedex offers an expansive informational database to assist in learning about diagnosis, drugs, diseases, and treatment! The additional sources the website offers can help with papers or specific knowledge about a variety of diseases, as well.

Chicago Manual of Style Guide

 

The Chicago Manual of Style is an online handbook that can help anyone who wants to create a fluid and grammatically correct paper as well as answering questions you may have about technique/style. Music, History, Education, Psychology, Political Science, and Religion majors all use Chicago style of citation.

 

This online handbook is handy because you can use it at any time, it’s free, and you don’t have to check out/rent a physical copy that has to be returned: you can use it for reference for the rest of your studies here at William Jewell.

 

You can find it on Curry Library’s website by clicking on “Databases.”

 

When you enter The Chicago Manual of Style, to begin, you can choose the box of, “Chicago Style Q & A” if you have some quick questions. If you would like to read the manual, click the box that says, “Chicago-Style Quick Guide.” Among those boxes is also one dedicated to video tutorials.

 

 

When looking through the manual, there will be three different types of citation. Select the one accurate to you.

 

 

You will see the guide page. A link to examples will be at the top of the page. On the right there are links to jump to sections within the page.

 

MLA Bibliography Guide

MLA Bibliography provides searchable access to more than 2 million bibliographic citations to journal articles, books, dissertations, and scholarly websites. It indexes materials in academic disciplines such as language, literature, folklore, linguistics, literary theory and criticism, and the dramatic arts. Coverage includes literature from all over the world — Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, and North and South America. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open Teacher Reference Center, at the center of the screen is the search bar, where you can begin your search. Using concise keywords allows for more accurate results. Underneath the search bar is the option for an “Advanced Search.” This is suggested if there is something specific you are looking for. If you click “Advanced Search,” there are the options to limit the search. Press search when you’re done.

 

 


 

Once you press search, the search results will appear. Again, on the left you can choose to limit your search. On the right, you can organize your search results by oldest, newest, author, or relevance. Find a source you think is useful and select the title.

 

 

Once you click the title, the source’s page appears. There, it gives you the metadata of the source. To the right, there is a toolbar that holds some options for you. You can add the source to your google drive, a folder, print it, email, save, cite, export, create notes for your research, a link to this page, and the option to share the source. Below the metadata is the source. There is the option to listen to it for the hard of seeing.

 

 

Good luck on your research

Web of Science Guide

 

Web of Science

 

Web of Science is a citation index that assists in citation mapping, citation management tools, counts, and analysis tools. It’s search options are very specific, allowing you to quickly and easily access relevant results. You can find it on Curry Library’s website.

 

A first glance of the website reveals all the search assisting tools. You can customize your search by topic, title, author, and others, change the time span for older or more recent results, and discover additional and specific methods with Web of Science’s tutorial.

 

 

Scrolling down further will reveal the option to save your search, and although you have to register and log in to do so, it is a handy tool for long research projects!

 

 

Once you’ve decided on your search, your results list will appear. A convenient function of Web of Science is its “View Abstract” button, which allows you to read an article’s summary without opening a new page. You can read all about it and decide if it is relevant to your needs without leaving the page!

 

 

Once you’ve decided on an article, click on the page to view all of its basic information. This page includes information for citation, and it provides links to other relevant articles.

 

 

 

To access the full article, click on “Look up full text” at the top of the page.

 

 

This will lead you to a Google scholar page, where you can find the option to have the article cited for you and to access the full PDF (which you can save to your computer for safekeeping!). You can also click on the article title if you want to view the article in a web browser.

 

 

If the article is not available to you and requires you to purchase it, you can request access to it via Curry Library, no charge to you! Please ensure that you request it in advance, because it can take a few days or weeks for the request to be processed.

 

Another handy tool of Web of Science is its “mark” system. Once you’ve clicked on an article, you can click on “Add to Marked List,” and a check mark will appear on your search! This function clearly shows you which articles you have already seen, so you won’t make any repeats and quicken your research!

 

 

 

All these functions make Web of Science quick and easy to use for long and extensive research!

AA Science Magazine

AA Science Magazine is a database of scientific news, academic journals,possible science-related jobs, and articles. You can find it on Curry Library’s website.

 

If you scroll down the page, AA Science Magazine shows you a table of contents of the current volume. The list of articles are on the left and the rest of contents are linked on the right hand side. Below the contents is an explanation of the cover of the current issue.

 

 

If you’re looking for articles from past issues, at the top of the page, the search is in the right hand corner. Use specific keywords to get an accurate search result, and then press enter.

 

The search results should pop up. If you are looking for a specific type of source, article type, author, or date, look to the left hand side and press “Update Search.” If you wish to reorganize the search results by oldest or newest, press the drop-down bar on the right hand side.

 

 

Once you have found the article you’re looking for, click the title. When you do, a popup should occur that gives you a scan of the original article from the physical Science Magazine. You can read the article like this, or you can press the small “X” on the right hand corner of the popup.

 

 

When you click out of the window, you have access to citation essentials under the title (volume, issue number, pages, date, and DOI. Underneath that, you have the article, article information, and a pdf of the article for you to download. On the right hand side, you have quick links to email, save, share to social media, print, or cite the article.

 

 

AA Science Magazine is a quick and easy way to do some research on anything science related.

ABI/Inform Complete

ABI/Inform Complete is a great database for researching business and government. It’s very similar if you have used other “ProQuest” databases. You can access ABI/Inform Complete via the Curry Library Website.

 

When entering ABI/Inform Complete, you can select if you would like full text and/or peer reviewed articles underneath the search bar. If you need some search tips, click the link on the right hand side also underneath the search bar. To begin with a basic search, insert specific keywords in the search bar to begin and press enter.

 


 

If you have a specific search, select advanced search on the top left hand corner. Select it, and a page that offers lots of different options opens. There, you can fill in specific details such as keywords, publication dates, people, subject, location, source type, document type, and language.

 

 


 

After you search, the results should pop up. You can sort the search results by oldest or newest using the dropdown bar on the left. Underneath that, you can limit your search results by type, date, publication type, subject, company, location, person, language, and database. At the top of the search on the right hand side, there are links to cite, email, print, and save any specific articles that may be helpful in your research.

Once you find an article that you think will aid you in your search, click the title. Under the title in the new screen, you can choose the tab to give you specific details about the article like the author, publication, volume, issue, page, year, and publisher. On the right is a button that you can download the article. Underneath that, is the same options to cite, email, print, and save this specific article. Beneath that is related articles that may also be useful to you.

 

Good luck on your research!

Academic Search

Academic Search is a great database for general research. It’s very similar if you have used other “ProQuest” databases. You can access Academic Search via the Curry Library Website.

 

When entering Academic Search, you can select if you would like full text and/or peer reviewed articles underneath the search bar. If you need some search tips, click the link on the right hand side also underneath the search bar. To begin with a basic search, insert specific keywords in the search bar to begin and press enter.

 


 

If you have a specific search, select advanced search on the top left hand corner. Select it, and a page that offers lots of different options opens. There, you can fill in specific details such as keywords, publication dates, people, subject, location, source type, document type, and language.

 

 


 

After you search, the results should pop up. You can sort the search results by oldest or newest using the dropdown bar on the left. Underneath that, you can limit your search results by type, date, publication type, subject, company, location, person, language, and database. At the top of the search on the right hand side, there are links to cite, email, print, and save any specific articles that may be helpful in your research.

Once you find an article that you think will aid you in your search, click the title. Under the title in the new screen, you can choose the tab to give you specific details about the article like the author, publication, volume, issue, page, year, and publisher. On the right is a button that you can download the article. Underneath that, is the same options to cite, email, print, and save this specific article. Beneath that is related articles that may also be useful to you.

 

Good luck on your research!

Accounting and Tax

 

Accounting and Tax is a great database for general research. It’s very similar if you have used other “ProQuest” databases. You can access Accounting and Tax via the Curry Library Website.

 

When entering Accounting and Tax,, you can select if you would like full text and/or peer reviewed articles underneath the search bar. If you need some search tips, click the link on the right hand side also underneath the search bar. To begin with a basic search, insert specific keywords in the search bar to begin and press enter.

 


 

If you have a specific search, select advanced search on the top left hand corner. Select it, and a page that offers lots of different options opens. There, you can fill in specific details such as keywords, publication dates, people, subject, location, source type, document type, and language.

 

 


 

After you search, the results should pop up. You can sort the search results by oldest or newest using the dropdown bar on the left. Underneath that, you can limit your search results by type, date, publication type, subject, company, location, person, language, and database. At the top of the search on the right hand side, there are links to cite, email, print, and save any specific articles that may be helpful in your research.

Once you find an article that you think will aid you in your search, click the title. Under the title in the new screen, you can choose the tab to give you specific details about the article like the author, publication, volume, issue, page, year, and publisher. On the right is a button that you can download the article. Underneath that, is the same options to cite, email, print, and save this specific article. Beneath that is related articles that may also be useful to you.

 

Good luck on your research!

 

 

American Chemical Society Legacy Archives

American Chemical Society Legacy Archives is a database great for researching history, chemistry, biology, physics, medicine, agriculture, and engineering. You can find it on Curry Library’s website.

 

When you enter ACSLA, you can search for specific journals or ebooks in the right hand corner. Underneath that is the search bar with three tabs, search, citation, and subject. These are the three different ways you can look for resources. On the right side of the search bar is the “Advanced Search” option, where you can search with specific keywords, content type, publication date, access type, and other ACSLA-specific options.

 

 

Once you perform your search, the results will pop up. On the left, you can narrow your search by publication, manuscript type, author, and publication date. If you see an article you think may be helpful, on the right of it, you can open and download a PDF of it. If you want to read an article and get more information, click the title.

 

 

Once you select a title, the article’s page shows up--there, you can read it. On the right, again you can download a pdf of the article. Beneath that, you can download a citation or email it. Under the article ACSLA offers similarly-themed articles that may also help you in your research.

 

 

 

Good luck on your research!

American Chemical Society Web Editions

American Chemical Society Web Editions is a database great for researching chemistry. You can find it on Curry Library’s website.

 

When you enter ACSWE, you can search for specific journals or ebooks in the right hand corner. Underneath that is the search bar with three tabs, search, citation, and subject. These are the three different ways you can look for resources. On the right side of the search bar is the “Advanced Search” option, where you can search with specific keywords, content type, publication date, access type, and other ACSWE options.

 

 

Once you perform your search, the results will pop up. On the left, you can narrow your search by publication, manuscript type, author, and publication date. If you see an article you think may be helpful, on the right of it, you can open and download a PDF of it. If you want to read an article and get more information, click the title.

 

 

Once you select a title, the article’s page shows up--there, you can read it. On the right, again you can download a pdf of the article. Beneath that, you can download a citation or email it. Under the article, ACSWE offers similarly-themed articles that may also help you in your research.

 

 

 

Good luck on your research!

American Doctoral Dissertations

American Doctoral Dissertations is a great database for history, political science, psychology, sociology, and general research. You can find it on Curry Library’s website.

 

When you open up American Doctoral Dissertations, at the center of the screen is the search bar, where you can begin your search. Using concise keywords allows for more accurate results. Underneath the search bar is the option for an “Advanced Search.” This is suggested if there is something specific you are looking for. If you click “Advanced Search,” there are the options to limit the search to specific terms, publication dates, and specific universities. Press search when you’re done.

 

 

 

Once you press search, the search results will appear. Again, on the left you can choose to limit your search. On the right, you can organize your search results by oldest, newest, author, or relevance. Under the titles of each entry, it will describe what type of source it is (book/ dissertation/thesis), a citation of the source, subjects, and possibly the beginning of a summary. Find a source you think is useful and select the title.

 

 

Once you click the title, the source’s page appears. There, it gives you the author, advisor, document type, year, subject, summary, university, a url to the source, and an accession number. To the right, there is a toolbar that holds some options for you. You can add the source to your google drive, a folder, print it, email, save, cite, export, create notes for your research, a link to this page, and the option to share the source.

 

Good luck on your research!

 

American FactFinder

American FactFinder is a database that is useful for researching population, housing, economics, and geography. You can find it on the Curry Library website.

 

When you enter American FactFinder, the search bar is on the left hand side. Underneath, you can click the guided search if you wish for American FactFinder to help guide you to what information you need. Third down is the advanced search, where you can search by topics, geographies, race and ethnic groups, industry codes, and EEO Occupation Codes. Further down the page on the left, you can look through the different sets of data that American FactFinder can provide. Insert which area you would like to research and press “GO.”

 

 

Once you insert which place you would like to research, the result should appear. On the left are the tabs of different sets of data you can look at for that specific place: population, age, business and industry, education, governments, housing, income, origins and language, poverty, race and hispanic origin, and veterans. On the right, you can save and print the search results.

 

 

Good luck on your research!

American Memory

American Memory is a database that has many primary and secondary sources for those interested in american history. You can find it on Curry Library’s website.

 

When you select the link from the library website a page shows up. Click the first link at the top of the page to redirect to the database.

 

 

After you select the link, you are sent to the main page. At the top of the page is the search bar--use concise keywords for best results. Just to the left of the search bar is a drop down menu. This is where you can select the type of format you are looking for. To the far left of the page is a list of ways you can refine your search: format, date, contributor, subject, language, and type of access. On the right under the search bar, you can see there are two drop down menus. This is where you can choose how you would like to see your search results.

 

 

Once you insert your important keywords, the results from your search should appear. An image of the source will be on the left, the type of source on the right on top. Following below will be the title, the contributor, and the date. Find a source that you think will be helpful and click the title.

 

 

The source should open in a new tab. On the left, the type of categories this source fits in will be on the left. At the top right, you can choose to print, share, or save this source. Below the source, there will be comments that other users have added, and you can add your own!

 

 

 

Good luck on your research!

Art Index

Art Index is a great way to search information on different artwork or films. You can find it on Curry Library’s website.

 

When you open up Art Index, at the center of the screen is the search bar, where you can begin your search. Using concise keywords allows for more accurate results. Underneath the search bar is the option for an “Advanced Search.” This is suggested if there is something specific you are looking for. If you click “Advanced Search,” there are the options to limit the search to specific terms, publication dates, and specific universities. Press search when you’re done.

 

 




 

Once you press search, the search results will appear. Again, on the left you can choose to limit your search. On the right, you can organize your search results by oldest, newest, author, or relevance. Under the titles of each entry, it will describe what type of source it is, a citation of the source, subjects, and possibly the beginning of a summary. Find a source you think is useful and select the title.

 

 

Once you click the title, the source’s page appears. There, it gives you the author, document type, year, subject, word count, ISSN, and an accession number. To the right, there is a toolbar that holds some options for you. You can add the source to your google drive, a folder, print it, email, save, cite, export, create notes for your research, a link to this page, and the option to share the source. Scrolling down will be the source. You also have the option to listening to the source.

 

 

Good luck on your research!

ATLA Religion with ATLA Serials

ATLA Religion with ATLA Serials has thousands of religious journals, book reviews, articles, and essays. You can find it on Curry Library’s website.

 

When you open up ATLA Religion with ATLA Serials, at the center of the screen is the search bar, where you can begin your search. Using concise keywords allows for more accurate results. Underneath the search bar is the option for an “Advanced Search.” This is suggested if there is something specific you are looking for. If you click “Advanced Search,” there are the options to limit the search to specific terms, publication dates, and specific universities. Press search when you’re done.

 

 




 

Once you press search, the search results will appear. Again, on the left you can choose to limit your search. On the right, you can organize your search results by oldest, newest, author, or relevance. Under the titles of each entry, it will describe what type of source it is, a citation of the source, subjects, and possibly the beginning of a summary. Find a source you think is useful and select the title.

 

 

Once you click the title, the source’s page appears. There, it gives you the author, publisher, source, ISSN, publication year, language, related works, records, document type, genre, when it was issued, availability, and accession number. To the right, there is a toolbar that holds some options for you. You can add the source to your google drive, a folder, print it, email, save, cite, export, create notes for your research, a link to this page, and the option to share the source.

 

Good luck on your research!

 

 

Background Notes

Background Notes is a good database for those studying Politics and Foreign Relations. You can find it on Curry Library’s website.

 

When you open up to Background Notes, you see a page full with links to different countries. If you are looking for information on a specific place, you can click on the link of the name of that country. Also, there is a toolbar at the top of the page where you can explore particular policies, groups and organizations, learn about the US Secretary of State, the press, and other general regions in the world. There is also a set of quick links on the left hand side if you wish to learn about passports, visas, and other useful information about the US. On the top right hand side, there is a search bar if you want to find something specific.

 

 

If for example, I’m searching about women’s issues, I would select it under “Policy Issues” in the toolbar. You should see a summary and a video about this issue. On the left are links that can lead you to different parts of this particular section. Beneath that are tweets that speak about that particular issue. Also below that are important updates/events about his particular policy.

 

 

If I selected a particular country from the first page, a fact sheet all about France-US relations appear. At the bottom of the page, there are a set of links that allow you to explore that country’s governmental websites, statements, and reports.

 

 

 

Banking Information Source

Banking Information Source is a great database for research on banking industry publications on banking trends. It’s very similar if you have used other “ProQuest” databases. You can access Academic Search via the Curry Library Website.

 

When entering Banking Information Source, you can select if you would like full text and/or peer reviewed articles underneath the search bar. If you need some search tips, click the link on the right hand side also underneath the search bar. To begin with a basic search, insert specific keywords in the search bar to begin and press enter.

 


 

If you have a specific search, select advanced search on the top left hand corner. Select it, and a page that offers lots of different options opens. There, you can fill in specific details such as keywords, publication dates, people, subject, location, source type, document type, and language.

 

 


 

After you search, the results should pop up. You can sort the search results by oldest or newest using the dropdown bar on the left. Underneath that, you can limit your search results by type, date, publication type, subject, company, location, person, language, and database. At the top of the search on the right hand side, there are links to cite, email, print, and save any specific articles that may be helpful in your research.

Once you find an article that you think will aid you in your search, click the title. Under the title in the new screen, you can choose the tab to give you specific details about the article like the author, publication, volume, issue, page, year, and publisher. On the right is a button that you can download the article. Underneath that, is the same options to cite, email, print, and save this specific article. Beneath that is related articles that may also be useful to you.

 

Good luck on your research!

 

Business Insights: Global

Business Insights: Global is a database for studying business or economics. You can access Business Insights: Global via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open it up, there is a toolbar that gives you different categories that you can search under. There is also a search bar that you can use, and on the right of it, you can select how your keywords fit. Under a search button, there is the Advanced Search option, where you can narrow your search by content type, publication, peer review, full text, articles, industry, and start date.

 

 

 

Once you click search, the results should appear. In this example, we’ll be searching a company. On the right will be their sales/revenue, the amount of employees,and their location. Under the name of the company, there will be a quick summary of the company.

 

 

When you find the result you need, click the name. Once the result loads up, it will give you a link to the company website, a business email, and the company hierarchy. Across the top of the page, there will be three boxes that will give you key information of that particular business. Underneath the boxes will give you a business description, the fiscal year, the company type, CIK, auditor, contact information, officers, variant names, historical revenue, and their document number.  At the top right, there are small grey squares that allow you to print, download, save, or share this document. On the left, there are related subjects and other company information links.

 

 

Business Source Premier

Business Source Premier is a database that is great for discovering about business and economics. You can find it on Curry Library’s site.

 

When you click on Business Source Premier, you’ll want to select the third link down the page-- “Business Searching Interface.”

 

 

Once you do, you see plenty of fields that you can fill out to narrow down your search on top of the important keywords that you can put in the search bars at the top of the page. On the right hand side you can casually browse Business Source Premier by different subjects, authors, company, etc.

 

 

After you hit search, the results should appear. On the left, you can continue to narrow down your search. On the right, you can see related images. Once you find a source that you think will be helpful, click its title.

 

 

Once the source appears, you will give you important information about it. On the right, there are are a set of tools you can use like print, email, save, cite, export, link, or share the source.

 

Center for Disease Control

Center for Disease Control is a governmental website for researching all types of diseases and conditions as well as tips for healthy living. You can find it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you enter the Center for Disease Control website, there will be a search bar in the top right hand corner. This is where you can begin your search. Insert concise keywords and hit enter. There is also the option to click a tab under the search bar that says CDC A-Z Index and search by letter.

 

 

Once you make your search, the results should appear. Search through to find a source that may be helpful. Click the title.

 

 

Once you click the title, you will be sent to the source’s page. There, you will receive the CDC’s information on that disease/condition. At the bottom, if you use that information, is a premade citation that you can use. On the left are tabs you can open for more information on the disease being  discussed.

 

Central and Eastern European Academic Source

Central and Eastern European Academic Source is a database that is great for researching business & economics, medical sciences, political science, law, library & information sciences, literature, linguistics, history and sociology relating to this geographic region. You can find it on the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open up Central and Eastern European Academic Source, at the center of the screen is the search bar, where you can begin your search. Using concise keywords allows for more accurate results. Underneath the search bar is the option for an “Advanced Search.” This is suggested if there is something specific you are looking for. If you click “Advanced Search,” there are the options to limit the search to specific terms, publication dates, and specific universities. Press search when you’re done.

 

 




 

Once you press search, the search results will appear. Again, on the left you can choose to limit your search. On the right, you can organize your search results by oldest, newest, author, or relevance. Under the titles of each entry, it will describe what type of source it is, a citation of the source, subjects, and possibly the beginning of a summary. Find a source you think is useful and select the title.

 

 

Once you click the title, the source’s page appears. There, it gives you the author, source, type, subject, keywords, summary, author affiliations, ISSN, and an accession number. To the right, there is a toolbar that holds some options for you. You can add the source to your google drive, a folder, print it, email, save, cite, export, create notes for your research, a link to this page, and the option to share the source.

 

Good luck on your research!

CINAHL

CINAHL is a database full of thousands of medical journals. You can access it through the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open up CINAHL, at the center of the screen is the search bar, where you can begin your search. Using concise keywords allows for more accurate results. Underneath the search bar is the option for an “Advanced Search.” This is suggested if there is something specific you are looking for. If you click “Advanced Search,” there are the options to limit the search to specific terms, authors and specific age groups. Press search when you’re done.

 


 



 

Once you press search, the search results will appear. Again, on the left you can choose to limit your search. On the right, you can organize your search results by oldest, newest, author, or relevance. Under the titles of each entry, it will describe what type of source it is, a citation of the source, subjects, and possibly the beginning of a summary. Find a source you think is useful and select the title.

 

 

Once you click the title, the source’s page appears. There, it gives you the author, source, type, subject, keywords, summary, author affiliations, ISSN, and an accession number. To the right, there is a toolbar that holds some options for you. You can add the source to your google drive, a folder, print it, email, save, cite, export, create notes for your research, a link to this page, and the option to share the source.

 

 

Good luck on your research!

Civil War Governors of Kentucky

Civil War Governors of Kentucky is a database full of images, transcripts, and documents from the Civil War. You can access it through the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open Civil War Governors of Kentucky, there is a search bar where you can begin your research. Below the search bar is the Advanced Search option where you can search within specific fields Press enter to begin. At the bottom of the page, you can see featured collections, exhibits, and news.

 

 

Your results should appear. On the left hand side are ways to narrow down your search--date, type, collection, and place of creation. There will be a thumbnail of each source with a title, date, and description. Click the title of a source that may be helpful to you.

 

 

Once you click on one, the source page will come up. On the left will be a picture of the source. On the right will be a clear-text version of the document. Underneath the source will be a tab where you can view the metadata, a tab for a citation you can use for your paper/project, and a tab to download the document.

 

Cochrane Controlled Trials Register

Cochrane Controlled Trials Register is a database full of thousands of medical journals. You can access it through the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open up Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, at the center of the screen is the search bar, where you can begin your search. Using concise keywords allows for more accurate results. Underneath the search bar is the option for an “Advanced Search.” This is suggested if there is something specific you are looking for. If you click “Advanced Search,” there are the options to limit the search to specific terms, authors and specific age groups. Press search when you’re done.

 

 

 

Once you press search, the search results will appear. Again, on the left you can choose to limit your search. On the right, you can organize your search results by oldest, newest, author, or relevance. Under the titles of each entry, it will describe what type of source it is, a citation of the source, subjects, and possibly the beginning of a summary. Find a source you think is useful and select the title.

 

 

Once you click the title, the source’s page appears. There, it gives you the author, source, contact information, status, keywords, summary, ISSN, and an accession number. To the right, there is a toolbar that holds some options for you. You can add the source to your google drive, a folder, print it, email, save, cite, export, create notes for your research, a link to this page, and the option to share the source.

 

 

Good luck on your research!

 

Cochrane Methodology Register

Cochrane Methodology Register is a database that holds medicine journals, articles, books, and conference proceedings. You can access it through the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open up Cochrane Methodology Register, at the center of the screen is the search bar, where you can begin your search. Using concise keywords allows for more accurate results. Underneath the search bar is the option for an “Advanced Search.” This is suggested if there is something specific you are looking for. If you click “Advanced Search,” there are the options to limit the search to specific terms, authors and specific age groups. Press search when you’re done.

 

 

 

Once you press search, the search results will appear. Again, on the left you can choose to limit your search. On the right, you can organize your search results by oldest, newest, author, or relevance. Under the titles of each entry, it will describe what type of source it is, a citation of the source, subjects, and possibly the beginning of a summary. Find a source you think is useful and select the title.

 

 

Once you click the title, the source’s page appears. There, it gives you the author, source, type, author affiliations, keywords, summary, ISSN, and an accession number. To the right, there is a toolbar that holds some options for you. You can add the source to your google drive, a folder, print it, email, save, cite, export, create notes for your research, a link to this page, and the option to share the source.

 

 

Good luck on your research!


 

 

Code of Federal Regulations

Code of Federal Regulations can be found on Curry Library’s site.

 

If you want some extra help during your research, select “Search Tips.”

 

 

When you open Code of Federal Regulations, you can begin your search on the left hand side. Select “Browse/Search Previous.”

 

Select a date and press go. After that, select what title you wish to look under. If you know what specific regulation you are looking for, you can go to simple search on the left hand side.

Your results will appear in a graph. Find what regulation you wish to view and click which parts that specific regulation is in.

 

 

You will be sent to a table of contents for that specific chapter. Select which section applies to your specific need.

 

 

Lastly, select the final set.

 

 

Communications and Mass Media Complete

Communications and Mass Media Complete is a database that has a large index of journals. You can access it via the Curry Library Database.

 

When you open up Communications and Mass Media Complete, at the center of the screen is the search bar, where you can begin your search. Using concise keywords allows for more accurate results. Underneath the search bar is the option for an “Advanced Search.” This is suggested if there is something specific you are looking for. If you click “Advanced Search,” there are the options to limit the search to specific terms, authors and specific age groups. Press search when you’re done.

 

 




 

Once you press search, the search results will appear. Again, on the left you can choose to limit your search. On the right, you can organize your search results by oldest, newest, author, or relevance. Under the titles of each entry, it will describe what type of source it is, a citation of the source, subjects, and possibly the beginning of a summary. Find a source you think is useful and select the title.

 

 

Once you click the title, the source’s page appears. There, it gives you the author, source, type, subject, codes, summary, word count, ISSN, DOI, and an accession number. To the right, there is a toolbar that holds some options for you. You can add the source to your google drive, a folder, print it, email, save, cite, export, create notes for your research, a link to this page, and the option to share the source. Underneath everything is the source. You also have the option to listen to it.

 

 

Good luck on your research!

 

Compilation of Presidential Documents

Compilation of Presidential Documents is a collection of official documents published by the White House Press Secretary. You can find it on the Curry Library website.

 

When you open up the Compilation of Presidential Documents, you will see a long list of years. Select which year that you need.

 

 

Select the month.

 

 

From there pops a list of documents. To the right of the name of the document, you can download a PDF, read the text of the document in a new tab, and under more, you can see important metadata--notes, category, publisher, president, collection, and locations.

 

 

Congress.gov

Congress.gov is a database full of official legislative information. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open congress.gov, there is a large search bar at the top. Just above it is a button for advanced searches (or you can press “More options” underneath the bar). This is a way to narrow your search results if you’re looking for something specific. On the right hand side, you can see current news as well as a way to find and contact your congress official.

 

 

When you hit enter, the search results will come up. You can see the name of the bill, the sponsor, the committees, the latest action on it, as well as an online tracker. At the top left hand side, you can save this search for later as well as downloading the search results.

 

 

Consumer Health Complete

Consumer Health Complete is a database full of consumer-oriented health content. It is designed to support patients’ information needs and foster an overall understanding of health-related topics. You can find it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you enter Consumer Health Complete, at the center of the screen is the search bar, where you can begin your search. Using concise keywords allows for more accurate results. Underneath the search bar is the option for an “Advanced Search.” This is suggested if there is something specific you are looking for. If you click “Advanced Search,” there are the options to limit the search to specific terms, authors and specific age groups. Press search when you’re done.

 

 

 

Once you press search, the search results will appear. Again, on the left you can choose to limit your search. On the right, you can organize your search results by oldest, newest, author, or relevance. Under the titles of each entry, it will describe what type of source it is, a citation of the source, subjects, and possibly the beginning of a summary. Find a source you think is useful and select the title.

 

 

Once you click the title, the source’s page appears. There, it gives you the author, source, subject, type, keywords, summary, ISSN, and an accession number. Underneath is the source. You also have the option to listen to it. To the right, there is a toolbar that holds some options for you. You can add the source to your google drive, a folder, print it, email, save, cite, export, create notes for your research, a link to this page, and the option to share the source.

 

 

Good luck on your research!

 

 

Data USA

Data USA is a database of US government data. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When DataUSA opens, there is a large search bar in the center of the screen. Scrolling down, there is a set of categories you can search through.

 

 

 

If searching for a place, you will receive information such as population, median age, median household income, poverty rate, number of employees, and median property value at the top. Under that are bookmarks for what section of the report you would like to see further down the page. Beneath the name of the city, you can add another city to compare the original search to. Click the “Add Comparison” and search the name of the city. Your screen will become a splitscreen.

 

 

 

If researching maps, you can choose your topic on the left hand side as well as the risk indicators. Underneath that are the stats for each state. You can also see the stats for a particular state by hovering over it. On the top right hand corner, you can view data, save the map, or share it. At the bottom of the map you can change what year the data is pulled from.

 

 

If you search universities, jobs, and degrees, they are all formatted just like the city search.

 

Diversity Studies Collection

Diversity Studies Collection is a database that provides an essential set of scholarly journals and cultural interest titles, including topics such as the Harlem Renaissance, Hispanic Heritage, women’s rights, and workplace diversity. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open the Diversity Studies Collection, there is a large search bar in the center of the page. You can also search by subject or publication using the buttons below the bar.

 

 

When you search, the results should appear. It will tell you what kind of source it is, the name, the author, date, publication, word count, and the beginning lines of the source. Beneath it are two buttons which you can download or save the source. If you find one you think will be helpful, click the title.

 

 

You will see the full text of the source, the option to listen to the text, and a toolbar on the right hand side that offers citation tools, notes, send to Google Drive, send to OneDrive, print, email, download, save, and share. At the bottom of the source is a citation you can use for your research paper/project. Below that are a list of related sources that could also be useful.

 

 

 

DOE Energy Citations

DOE Energy Citations provides free public access to over 266,000 full-text documents and bibliographic citations of Department of Energy (DOE) research report literature. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open DOE Energy Citations, there will be a large search bar in the center of the page. There will be a small green down arrow that opens a drop down menu that opens advanced search options if there is something specific that you are looking for such as title, author, and publication date. At the bottom of that drop down menu, there is a “More Options” link that you can narrow down to resource type, site, organization, and update dates.

 

 

 

When the search results appear, they will appear in a list. On the left hand side it gives you more options to narrow down your search. Each source gives you a title, the author, date, and summary of the source. When you find a source that seems helpful, click the title.

 

 

The source page will appear and you can see the metadata such as author, dates, etc. On the left hand side, you can save, share, print, and email the source. At the bottom of the source will be a citation that you can copy and paste for your research paper/project.

 

Education Research Complete

Education Research Complete provides indexing and abstracts for more than 2,300 journals, as well as full text for over 1,400 journals. This database also includes full text for more than 550 books and monographs, and full text for numerous education-related conference papers. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open Education Research Complete, at the center of the screen is the search bar, where you can begin your search. Using concise keywords allows for more accurate results. Underneath the search bar is the option for an “Advanced Search.” This is suggested if there is something specific you are looking for. If you click “Advanced Search,” there are the options to limit the search. Press search when you’re done.

 

 




 

Once you press search, the search results will appear. Again, on the left you can choose to limit your search. On the right, you can organize your search results by oldest, newest, author, or relevance. Find a source you think is useful and select the title.

 

 

Once you click the title, the source’s page appears. There, it gives you the author, source, type, subject, keywords, summary, author affiliations, ISSN, and an accession number. To the right, there is a toolbar that holds some options for you. You can add the source to your google drive, a folder, print it, email, save, cite, export, create notes for your research, a link to this page, and the option to share the source.

 

 

Good luck on your research!

Encyclopedia Britannica

Encyclopedia Britannica  has over 75,000 articles on a wide variety of topics, including hundreds of articles not found in the print version of Britannica. Includes links to 166,000 related websites, over 27,000 images and maps, plus 3,300 animations, videos, and audio files. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open Encyclopedia Britannica, there is a large search bar where you can input important keywords.Under the bar on the right side, there is a link for the advanced search option if you want to search for something particular. If you know what kind of source you would like to search, there are options also under the search bar. If you want to browse, there links on the right to look through articles, media, and biographies.

 

 

When you set a search, the results will be in a list. On the right hand side you can narrow your search via source type. Select a title of a source that may seem helpful.

 

 

At the top of the page will be tabs of the article, media, sources that are related, and article history. On the left will be a table of contents. Underneath will be links to related resources. At the top on the opposite side of the tabs will be options to share, print, cite, increase/decrease font size, and translate.

 

European Views of the Americans 1493-1750

European Views of the Americas 1493-1750  is a comprehensive guide to printed records about the Americas written in Europe before 1750 from European Americana: A Chronological Guide to Works Printed In Europe Relating to the Americas, 1493-1750. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open European Views of the Americas, at the center of the screen is the search bar, where you can begin your search. Using concise keywords allows for more accurate results. Underneath the search bar is the option for an “Advanced Search.” This is suggested if there is something specific you are looking for. If you click “Advanced Search,” there are the options to limit the search. Press search when you’re done.



 

 


 

Once you press search, the search results will appear. Again, on the left you can choose to limit your search. On the right, you can organize your search results by oldest, newest, author, or relevance. Find a source you think is useful and select the title.

 

 

Once you click the title, the source’s page appears. There, it gives you the metadata of the source. To the right, there is a toolbar that holds some options for you. You can add the source to your google drive, a folder, print it, email, save, cite, export, create notes for your research, a link to this page, and the option to share the source.

 

 

Good luck on your research!

 

Federal Register

Federal Register is the official daily publication for rules, proposed rules, and notices of Federal agencies and organizations, as well as executive orders and other presidential documents. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open Federal Register, you can browse via the third tab at the top of the page, search via the fourth tab, or imput important keywords in the search bar scrolling further down the page. Under the bar you can choose to limit your search between document types.

 

 

Your search results should come up in a list. On the left you can narrow your results by date, type, agency, topic, and section. A letter in a small grey circle on the left side of each source tells you what typeof source it is. Find a source that may be helpful and click the title.

 

 

When you click a title, you will arrive at the source page. On the right, you will see the document details as well as a link to a PDF version of the document. On the right of the document will be a toolbar. Starting from the top: table of contents, add a public comment, read other public comments, share the document, print, document markup tools, developer tools, and other official content.

 

Films on Demand

Films on Demand  is a library of thousands of streaming videos across all disciplines from Films Media Group. All users can search and view films or specific segments of films. If you establish a user account from within Films on Demand you can also create playlists from the various films/segments for your own use or for sharing with other users. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you enter Films on Demand, there is a search bar at the top of the page. Just under the search bar is the link for the advanced search option should you wish to search for a specific film.

 

 

Your results will appear in a list. On the right, you will see more ways to narrow your search results. Under each search result, you will have the options to share, preview, and add to a playlist. When you find a film that seems helpful, click the title.

 

When you click the title, you will be sent to the film’s page. To the right of the video player, you can see tabs to see the segments, film details, and a transcript of the video. Underneath the player is metadata as well as recommended similar films.

 

Global Issues in Context

Global Issues in Context provides news from all over the world from real sources and news stations from every country. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open Global Issues in Context, there is a search bar at the top of the page. To the right of the search bar is the advanced search button if you are looking for something specific. If you are unsure of what you want to view, click “Browse all topics.”

 

 

After searching, At the top of the page will be a description of the issue, and to the right hand side, there are links to each section of the page.

 

 

The sections are split by boxes, to see all in that specific category, click the title. At the bottom of the page are some related topics that could help in your research.

 

 

 

When looking through the different categories, you will see that sources will have a symbol to the left of it that displays the difficulty of the source. On the right will be what type of source it is. On the right hand side of the page will be a way to narrow your results.

 

 

GPO Access

GPO Access is a service of the U.S. Government Printing Office that provides free electronic access to a wealth of important information products produced by the Federal Government. The information provided on this site is the official, published version and the information retrieved from GPO Access can be used without restriction, unless specifically noted. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open up GPO Access, there will be a search bar at the top of the page. You can find the advanced search link on the right of it if you need to search for something in particular. If you aren’t sure what you’re looking for, you can browse on the right hand side.

 

 

Once you insert your search terms, the results page should appear. On the left, GPO gives you the ability to narrow your search by category. You can choose to sort your information by the drop down box. You can also choose to limit or expand the amount of results on the page. Click the title of a document that you think may be helpful.

 

 

When you click the title, it should open in a new tab as a PDF. From there, you would be allowed to print or download it.

 

GreenFILE

GreenFILE is a collection of scholarly, government and general-interest titles includes content on the environmental effects of individuals, corporations and local/national governments, and what can be done at each level to minimize these effects. You can access it via the Curry library Website.

 

When you open GreenFILE, at the center of the screen is the search bar, where you can begin your search. Using concise keywords allows for more accurate results. Underneath the search bar is the option for an “Advanced Search.” This is suggested if there is something specific you are looking for. If you click “Advanced Search,” there are the options to limit the search. Press search when you’re done.

 

 




 

Once you press search, the search results will appear. Again, on the left you can choose to limit your search. On the right, you can organize your search results by oldest, newest, author, or relevance. Find a source you think is useful and select the title.

 

 

Once you click the title, the source’s page appears. There, it gives you the metadata of the source. To the right, there is a toolbar that holds some options for you. You can add the source to your google drive, a folder, print it, email, save, cite, export, create notes for your research, a link to this page, and the option to share the source.

 

 

Good luck on your research!

Heritage Quest Online

Heritage Quest Online is a collection of six data sets: U.S. Federal Censuses from 1790 through 1930, with name indexes for many decades. In total the collection covers more than 140 million names. Genealogy and local history books deliver more than 7 million digitized page images from over 28,000 family histories, local histories, and other books. Periodical Source Index (PERSI) contains more than 2 million records covering titles published around the world since 1800. Revolutionary War records contains original images from pension and bounty land warrant application files help to identify more than 80,000 American Army, Navy, and Marine officers and enlisted men from the Revolutionary War era. Freedman’s Bank Records, with more than 480,000 names of bank applicants, their dependents, and heirs from 1865–1874, offers valuable data that can provide important clues to tracing African American ancestors prior to and immediately after the Civil War. LexisNexis U.S. Serial Set records the memorials, petitions, private relief actions made to the U.S. Congress back to 1789, with a total of more than 480,000 pages of information. You can find it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open Heritage Quest Online, you can begin your search by clicking “Search” button at the top left of the page. Scrolling down, there will be search tips of the day as well as a map guide.

 

 

 

After selecting search, you will be asked to select which collection you would like to search. Underneath the collections are the maps and photos you can look through as well as records that are in other locations.

 

 

 

Once you have chosen a collection, you will either need to fill out some boxes or select what place/time you would like to search within that collection. Try and fill out as many boxes as possible for most accurate search.

 

 

 

When you fill out the important boxes, a list of people will appear. On the right, there will be a picture of the result. On the left is a link to view the record. On the left, you can also edit your search from broader to exact.

 

 

The page will show the source information as well as a description. To the right there is a button to print it. There is also the option to have your results sent to your email and you can download them.

 

Historical Abstracts

Historical Abstracts provides searchable access to abstracts of journal articles and citations to book titles and dissertations gleaned from over 1700 journal titles dealing with the history of the world (excluding North America) from 1450 to the present. This authoritative database provides indexing of more than 2,300 academic historical journals in over 40 languages. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open Historical Abstracts, at the center of the screen is the search bar, where you can begin your search. Using concise keywords allows for more accurate results. Underneath the search bar is the option for an “Advanced Search.” This is suggested if there is something specific you are looking for. If you click “Advanced Search,” there are the options to limit the search. Press search when you’re done.

 

 




 

Once you press search, the search results will appear. Again, on the left you can choose to limit your search. On the right, you can organize your search results by oldest, newest, author, or relevance. Find a source you think is useful and select the title.

 

 

Once you click the title, the source’s page appears. There, it gives you the metadata of the source. To the right, there is a toolbar that holds some options for you. You can add the source to your google drive, a folder, print it, email, save, cite, export, create notes for your research, a link to this page, and the option to share the source.

 

 

Good luck on your research!

Hoover's Company Profiles

Hoover’s Company Profiles contains proprietary information about more than 40,000 public and non-public companies and 225,000 key executives. Hoover’s, widely recognized as a leader in company data, delivers in depth industry analyses, information on a company’s location, summary financials, top competitors, top officers and more. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you enter Hoover’s Company Profiles, you can select if you would like full text and/or peer reviewed articles underneath the search bar. If you need some search tips, click the link on the right hand side also underneath the search bar. To begin with a basic search, insert specific keywords in the search bar to begin and press enter.

 


 

If you have a specific search, select advanced search on the top left hand corner. Select it, and a page that offers lots of different options opens. There, you can fill in specific details such as keywords, publication dates, people, subject, location, source type, document type, and language.

 

 


 

After you search, the results should pop up. You can sort the search results by oldest or newest using the dropdown bar on the left. Underneath that, you can limit your search results by type, date, publication type, subject, company, location, person, language, and database. At the top of the search on the right hand side, there are links to cite, email, print, and save any specific articles that may be helpful in your research.

Once you find an article that you think will aid you in your search, click the title. Under the title in the new screen, you can choose the tab to give you specific details about the article like the author, publication, volume, issue, page, year, and publisher. On the right is a button that you can download the article. Underneath that, is the same options to cite, email, print, and save this specific article. Beneath that is related articles that may also be useful to you.

 

Good luck on your research!

ImageQuest

ImageQuest provides millions of rights-cleared images of all kinds for use in projects and presentations. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open ImageQuest, your search can begin at the top of the page with the search bar. Be sure to use specific and concise keywords for best results

 

 

When you begin your search, the results should show up. On the top left you can filter your results by collection and shape as well as clip art vs. photography. On the top right you can switch select multiple images from off to on and you will be able to download, email, and print more than one image at a time. Once you find an image you would like to use, select it.

 

When you select an image, a box will pop up.There you can receive more information on the image, cite, email, download and print the image.

 

 

 

JSTOR

JSTOR provides access to archived backfiles of more than one thousand journals in Arts & Sciences, Business, Language & Literature, General Science, Ecology & Botany, and Music. Journals may be searched or browsed. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

You can begin your search with the search bar in the center of the page. You can also click the link for advanced search that is underneath the bar if you’re looking for something specific. If you are just browsing, you can by subject, title, or publisher on the top of the page.

 

 

The search results will appear. On the left you can narrow your search results. At the top of the page you can reorganize the results. On the right of each source, you have the option to download or cite that specific source. Above the title of the source will be the type that it is. If you see something that you may deem useful, click the title.

 

 

When you select a title, it will provide metadata as well as the option again to download and cite. It also gives the option to share on social media and give information on the original publication of the source. Further down the page are tabs that allow you to view thumbnails and references. Beneath the tabs is a PDF of the document.

 

 

 

LexisNexis: Academic

LexisNexis: Academic provides full-text of more than 350 newspapers from the U.S. and around the world, many of which are updated daily. It also offers access to more than 300 magazines and journals, over 600 newsletters, and campus news from nearly 300 individual college/university papers. There are also broadcast transcripts from major television and radio networks, as well as political transcripts covering Congressional committee hearings, press briefings from the State, Justice, and Defense departments, and presidential news conferences. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.
 

When you open LexisNexis, you can begin your search with the red search bar in the center of the page. You can also search by subject above the search bar. Underneath it are the advanced search options if you are looking for something specific. Also, you can search the news, legal case, and company info with the boxes at the bottom of the page. If you are unsure what you are looking for, you can browse via the link at the top of the page.

 

 

When you search, the results will appear in a list. On the left you can narrow your search results. You can also search keywords/terms in the search bar on the right hand side. Underneath the search bar there are the options to print, email, and save documents. If you find something that you deem may be helpful, select the title.

 

 

You will be taken to the source page. Again, on the right you can save, email, and print the document. Underneath is the source document.

 

Library Music Source

Library Music Source includes a huge selection of vocal music, instrumental solos, piano music, orchestral parts and more. With so many titles at your fingertips, you’re sure to find the music you need. Use our powerful search engine to locate a specific work or browse through the collections by genre or by composer. You can even check out what other people are downloading in our Find Music section.Once you find the music you’re looking for, we don’t just show it to you on the screen. We let you download a copy to keep – print it as many times as you’d like! And with your LibraryMusicSource.com account, you’re not stuck with using the service on just one computer. You’ll be able to download files from any computer connected to the internet. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open Library Music Source, you can begin your search with the search bar at the top right hand corner. Input precise keywords for accurate results.

 

 

When you input your search, the results should appear in a list categorized by composer. On the left, you can narrow your search results by composer, instrument, and instrument. When you find the result that you deem useful, click the title to be sent to the source’s page.

 

 

You will be sent to the source page. Library Music Source has an overview and details of the source at the top of the page. Underneath that is a PDF preview of the sheet music. Below that are instructions on how to save/download the whole file per your internet browser.

 

 

Literature Resource Center

Literature Resource Center’s rich critical, biographical and contextual content supports interdisciplinary approaches, information literacy and the development of critical-thinking skills.Full-text articles from scholarly journals and literary magazines are combined with critical essays, work and topic overviews, full-text works, biographies, and more to provide a wealth of information on authors, their works, and literary movements. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open Literature Resource Center, there will be a search bar at the top of the page. You can choose what kind of keywords you will be inputting using the drop down menu in the search bar. Just to the right will be the advanced search options if you are looking for something specific.

 

 

On the right hand side are ways to narrow your search results. You can also search within your results using the search bar that is also on the right hand side. Underneath each document you can either save or download a PDF of the source. Once you find something that you think will be helpful to you, click the title.

 

 

When you select the title, you will be sent to the source page. You will be able to see a citation that you can use for your project/paper. To the right is a toolbar that allows you to create another citation, save to your Google Drive, send to OneDrive, print, email, download, save, or share the source.

 

LocatorPlus--National Library of Medicine

LocatorPlus--National Library of Medicine allows you to search several databases at the same time, including MEDLINE/PubMed, OLDMEDLINE, LOCATORplus, MEDLINEplus, DIRLINE, AIDS Meetings, Health Services Research Meetings, Space Life Sciences Meetings, HSRProj, and more. The databases index books, journal articles, conference proceedings, health topics, drug information, and research projects in progress. From these, there are over 1.2 million catalog records for books, audiovisuals, journals, computer files, and other materials. NLM is updated continuously. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

To begin, you can insert your search in the search bar on the left hand side. Just to the right of the bar, you can select what kind of search you will be performing. If you would like to limit your results to specific types of sources, the option is just below the search bar. If you would like more advanced options, click the tab that reads, “Advanced Menu Search.”

 

 

Your search results should appear in a list. If you would like to narrow your results, click the button on the right hand side. You can also organize your search results using the drop down bar on the left hand side. There is also a set of dots on the right of the title of the sources. This deems how relevant to your search it is. If you see a source that you would deem useful, click the title.

 

 

After you select the title, you will be sent to the source page. LPNLM will give you the metadata of the source. At the bottom of the page are the options to save, print, or email. You can choose what format of the source you wish.

 

Missouri Digital Heritage

Missouri Digital Heritage holds the Missouri State Archives, the Missouri State Library and other institutions from across the state. Through the Missouri Digital Heritage Initiative, the Missouri State Archives and the Missouri State Library, in partnership with the State Historical Society of Missouri, are assisting institutions across the state in digitizing their records and placing them online for easy access. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open Missouri Digital Heritage, there will be a search bar on the left hand side. Under the search button is a link to the advanced search option should you want to look for something specific. If you are unsure what to look for, you can browse by topic, media type, or institution at the top of the page. If you would like to look at other recommended resources, you can click “Educational Resources” also in the top toolbar at the top of the page.

 

 

When you search, the results will come up in a list. On the left hand side you will be able to narrow your search results. If there is a source that you deem useful, select the title. If you select the small grey box on the left side of the source, you will be able to use the options of the white buttons on the right hand side--save, print, or email.

 

 

Once you have selected a source, you will see the metadata for the source (description, subject, location, etc) opened in a new tab. Beneath the metadata is the option to share via email or social media. You can order a free low-resolution digital file by first selecting “Order this item” on the top right hand side.

 

 

Next, select “Order Now” under “Request Digital File.”

 

 

A form should appear. Fill out the form and be sure to keep the delivery option as an email to keep it free.

 

 

There, you can right click and “Save As” the image.

Library, Information Science, and Technology Abstracts

Library, Information Science, and Technology Abstracts indexes more than 560 core journals, nearly 50 priority journals, and nearly 125 selective journals; plus books, research reports and proceedings. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.
 

When you open LISTA,  at the center of the screen is the search bar, where you can begin your search. Using concise keywords allows for more accurate results. Underneath the search bar is the option for an “Advanced Search.” This is suggested if there is something specific you are looking for. If you click “Advanced Search,” there are the options to limit the search. Press search when you’re done.

 

 




 

Once you press search, the search results will appear. Again, on the left you can choose to limit your search. On the right, you can organize your search results by oldest, newest, author, or relevance. Find a source you think is useful and select the title.

 

 

Once you click the title, the source’s page appears. There, it gives you the metadata of the source. To the right, there is a toolbar that holds some options for you. You can add the source to your google drive, a folder, print it, email, save, cite, export, create notes for your research, a link to this page, and the option to share the source.

 

 

Good luck on your research!

National Technical Information Source

National Technical Information Source serves as the largest central resource for government-funded scientific, technical, engineering, and business related information available today. For more than 60 years, NTIS has assured businesses, universities, and the public timely access to approximately 3 million publications covering over 350 subject areas. Our mission supports the Department of Commerce mission to promote the nation’s economic growth by providing access to information that stimulates innovation and discovery. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open NTIS, you can begin your search on the left hand side via the search bar. If you would like to read some news, click “Newsroom” via the menu bar.

 

 

When you search, the results show up in a list. If something seems useful, click the title.

 

 

After clicking the title, you will either be sent to a page of the source or a link to said source.

 

Newspaper Archive

Newspaper Archive features over 120 million newspaper pages dating back from 1609 to the present. Includes community news, family history, world news, national news and more. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open Newspaper Archive, you can begin with a keyword search via the large search bar at the top of the page. Scrolling down, you could also search by name, subject, or location using the map or flags.

 

 

 

 

From selecting a place, you can choose to narrow down further by publication, city, keywords, or name. You can also use the map to the right to find a specific newspaper. There is also the advanced search option under the search boxes of names.

 

 

 

Once you narrow your search, options will appear in a list. You can search different types of records and different publications. Each source will have a date, a description, and a thumbnail. Once you find something that seems helpful, you may select the title.

 

 

There, a PDF scan of the document will appear. You can save, email, print, crop, edit contrast/brightness, zoom, as well as flip through pages. You can click and drag around the PDF.

 

Ox Research

Ox Research provides succinct analytical articles covering world and regional economic and political developments of major significance. It evaluates issues and events within a coherent political, social and economic framework. Additionally, it contains objective, multi-disciplinary articles compiled by an extensive international network of over 1,000 faculty members at Oxford and other leading universities around the world, as well as think-tanks and institutes of international standing. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you enter Ox Research, you can select if you would like full text and/or peer reviewed articles underneath the search bar. If you need some search tips, click the link on the right hand side also underneath the search bar. To begin with a basic search, insert specific keywords in the search bar to begin and press enter.

 


 

If you have a specific search, select advanced search on the top left hand corner. Select it, and a page that offers lots of different options opens. There, you can fill in specific details such as keywords, publication dates, people, subject, location, source type, document type, and language.

 

 


 

After you search, the results should pop up. You can sort the search results by oldest or newest using the dropdown bar on the left. Underneath that, you can limit your search results by type, date, publication type, subject, company, location, person, language, and database. At the top of the search on the right hand side, there are links to cite, email, print, and save any specific articles that may be helpful in your research.

Once you find an article that you think will aid you in your search, click the title. Under the title in the new screen, you can choose the tab to give you specific details about the article like the author, publication, volume, issue, page, year, and publisher. On the right is a button that you can download the article. Underneath that, is the same options to cite, email, print, and save this specific article. Beneath that is related articles that may also be useful to you.

 

Good luck on your research!

 

The Oxford English Dictionary

The Oxford English Dictionary is widely regarded as the accepted authority on the English language. It is a guide to the meaning, history, and pronunciation of 600,000 words— past and present—from across the English-speaking world. It is updated every three months. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open the Oxford English Dictionary website, you can begin your search using the search bar. Beneath it is the advanced search options. You can also browse the dictionary by category, timelines, sources, and thesaurus.

 

 

The word should appear at the top of the page. To the right, are words forwards and backwards alphabetically.You can click them to jump to that place in the dictionary. Underneath the word is the pronunciation, the origins, and the definition. Beneath that block are additions.

 

 

 

Oxford Islamic Studies Online

Oxford Islamic Studies Online brings together current scholarship in the field for to foster a more accurate and informed understanding of the Islamic world. It features reference content and commentary by renowned scholars in areas such as global Islamic history, concepts, people, practices, politics, and culture, and is regularly updated. Oxford Islamic Studies Online encompasses over 5,000 reference entries, chapters from scholarly and introductory works, Qur’anic materials, primary sources, images, maps, and timelines, and offers a multi-layered reference experience designed to provide a first stop for anyone needing information and context on Islam. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

To begin, you can choose to browse either by category, biography, chaptered works, primary sources, or images or maps.

 

 

There, some results in alphabetical order should appear. You can choose to refine your results on the right hand side by era, topic, or region. You can also choose to search using the bar at the top, or you can choose which letter of the alphabet you wish to search. If you see a source that seems useful, click the title.

 

 

There, you will be sent to the source page. On the left, you can choose to print, email, or cite. You also have the option, along that same toolbar, to highlight passages. Also, if you wish, can highlight a portion and perform a search using the “Look it Up” option in the toolbar. At the bottom is a bibliography.

 

 

 

At the top is also a Qur’an verse lookup if it is mentioned in your article as well as a date converter. There is also a search bar to begin a new search on the left.

 

Pharmaceutical News Index

Pharmaceutical News Index is an insider’s guide to healthcare research, development and regulatory issues. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you enter Pharmaceutical News Index, you can select if you would like full text and/or peer reviewed articles underneath the search bar. If you need some search tips, click the link on the right hand side also underneath the search bar. To begin with a basic search, insert specific keywords in the search bar to begin and press enter.

 


 

If you have a specific search, select advanced search on the top left hand corner. Select it, and a page that offers lots of different options opens. There, you can fill in specific details such as keywords, publication dates, people, subject, location, source type, document type, and language.

 

 


 

After you search, the results should pop up. You can sort the search results by oldest or newest using the dropdown bar on the left. Underneath that, you can limit your search results by type, date, publication type, subject, company, location, person, language, and database. At the top of the search on the right hand side, there are links to cite, email, print, and save any specific articles that may be helpful in your research.

 

Once you find an article that you think will aid you in your search, click the title. Under the title in the new screen, you can choose the tab to give you specific details about the article like the author, publication, volume, issue, page, year, and publisher. On the right is a button that you can download the article. Underneath that, is the same options to cite, email, print, and save this specific article. Beneath that is related articles that may also be useful to you.

 

Good luck on your research!

Philosopher's Index

Philosopher’s Index monitors over 550 journals from more than 40 countries and is updated quarterly. Major areas of coverage include aesthetics, axiology, metaphilosophy, metaphysics, philosophical anthropology, philosophy of education, philosophy of epistemology, philosophy of ethics, philosophy of history, philosophy of language, philosophy of logic, philosophy of religion, philosophy of science, political philosophy, and social philosophy. This resource is limited to 4 simultaneous users at a time. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open Philosopher’s Index,  at the center of the screen is the search bar, where you can begin your search. Using concise keywords allows for more accurate results. Underneath the search bar is the option for an “Advanced Search.” This is suggested if there is something specific you are looking for. If you click “Advanced Search,” there are the options to limit the search. Press search when you’re done.

 

 




 

Once you press search, the search results will appear. Again, on the left you can choose to limit your search. On the right, you can organize your search results by oldest, newest, author, or relevance. Find a source you think is useful and select the title.

 

 

Once you click the title, the source’s page appears. There, it gives you the metadata of the source. To the right, there is a toolbar that holds some options for you. You can add the source to your google drive, a folder, print it, email, save, cite, export, create notes for your research, a link to this page, and the option to share the source.

 

 

Good luck on your research!

Points of View Reference Center

Points of View Reference Center provides more than 280 topics, each with an overview (objective background/description), point (argument), counterpoint (opposing argument), and Critical Thinking Guide. Topics covered include: affirmative action, cloning, DNA profiling, HIV/AIDS status disclosure, immigration, Iraq, Israel & the Palestinians, Katrina and FEMA response, nuclear proliferation, separation of church and state, standardized testing, stem cell research, tax cuts, voting machines, and many more. Points of View Reference Center includes more than 1,300 main essays. The database also offers guides to debate, developing arguments and writing position papers. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open Points of View Reference Center, you can begin your search with the search bar at the top left hand corner.The advanced search is just below it if you are looking for something specific. You can browse by source type above it or scrolling down and browsing by category.

 

 

When search, your results should show in a list. On the left hand side you can narrow your results. On the top right you can organize the results. If you find something that may be useful, select the title.

 

 

When you click the title, you will be sent to the source page. There you will be able to see the metadata. Below that is the source. You will also have the option to listen to it for those hard of seeing. On the right hand side will be a toolbar where you can print, email, save, cite, export, create a note, link, or share the source.

 

ProQuest Central

ProQuest Central interface allows users to search up to 4 article databases; Biological Sciences, International Index to Music Periodicals, ProQuest Central, and Wall Street Journal. The ProQuest Central database includes over 40 smaller databases holding material from over 17,000 sources covering 160 subjects. Over half the resources offer full-text online. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open ProQuest Central, you can select if you would like full text and/or peer reviewed articles underneath the search bar. If you need some search tips, click the link on the right hand side also underneath the search bar. To begin with a basic search, insert specific keywords in the search bar to begin and press enter.

 


 

If you have a specific search, select advanced search on the top left hand corner. Select it, and a page that offers lots of different options opens. There, you can fill in specific details such as keywords, publication dates, people, subject, location, source type, document type, and language.

 

 


 

After you search, the results should pop up. You can sort the search results by oldest or newest using the dropdown bar on the left. Underneath that, you can limit your search results by type, date, publication type, subject, company, location, person, language, and database. At the top of the search on the right hand side, there are links to cite, email, print, and save any specific articles that may be helpful in your research.

Once you find an article that you think will aid you in your search, click the title. Under the title in the new screen, you can choose the tab to give you specific details about the article like the author, publication, volume, issue, page, year, and publisher. On the right is a button that you can download the article. Underneath that, is the same options to cite, email, print, and save this specific article. Beneath that is related articles that may also be useful to you.

 

Good luck on your research!

PsychArticles

PsychArticles database offers full-text articles for journals published by the American Psychological Association, the APA Educational Publishing Foundation, the Canadian Psychological Association and Hogrefe & Huber. The database includes all material from the print journals. Many titles go back to volume 1, issue 1. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open PsychArticles, at the center of the screen is the search bar, where you can begin your search. Using concise keywords allows for more accurate results. Underneath the search bar is the option for an “Advanced Search.” This is suggested if there is something specific you are looking for. If you click “Advanced Search,” there are the options to limit the search. Press search when you’re done.

 


 

 

Once you press search, the search results will appear. Again, on the left you can choose to limit your search. On the right, you can organize your search results by oldest, newest, author, or relevance. Find a source you think is useful and select the title.

 

 

Once you click the title, the source’s page appears. There, it gives you the metadata of the source.Below it is the source. PsychArticles gives you the option to listen to the source for the hard of seeing. To the right, there is a toolbar that holds some options for you. You can add the source to your google drive, a folder, print it, email, save, cite, export, create notes for your research, a link to this page, and the option to share the source.

 

 

 

Good luck on your research!

PubMed Central

PubMed Central is a digital archive of life sciences journal literature, developed and managed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) at the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM). You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open PubMed Central, you can begin your search using the search bar at the top of the page. If you are looking for something specific, you can use the advanced search option underneath the search bar.

 

 

When you search, the results will be in a list. On the right, you can limit your search. On the right are related images. Once you find something that you think may be useful, select the title.

 

 

Once you click a title, you will be sent to the source page. On the right side will be a link to a PDF version of the source as well as a citation. Just below that will be options to share the source via social media.

Report Linker Services

Report Linker Services is a free tool which gives you access to the top-notch quality market research resources. It provides a powerful search engine which collects a huge amount of industry data on a day-to-day basis. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open Report Linker Services, you can begin your search by using the large search bar in the center of the page.

 

 

You will be able to see a list of sources that correlate with your search. Click a source that you think may be useful.

 

Science Citation Index Expanded

Science Citation Index Expanded has over 150 Million Records. Articles, patents, data sets, books and more.You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open Science Citation Index Expanded, you can begin your search with the search bar using important and concise keywords. On the right of the bar you can select what kind of keywords you are searching. Just above are tabs if you would like to try a different type of search including advanced search for those looking for something very specific. Just below the bar is some extra ways to narrow your search. To the right there is a button for some extra tips to make your search successful.

 

 

When you search, your results will appear in a list. At the top will be a way to organize your search results. To the left are options to narrow your search results. To the right of each source is a citation count. This can be useful when searching for sources that are useful. If you find one that you wish to see, select the title.

 

 

You will be sent to the source page. At the top will be options to print and email the source. To the right you can see a report on usage and citations. There will be a button top left for a full text of the source. The page will hold the metadata of the source as well. Below the metadata will be the citation within the source.

 

 

Snapshots

Snapshots offers top-line international market research overviews focusing on 40+ industries in more than 40 countries worldwide, including regional summaries. It provides market size, share, forecasts and segments. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

you can select if you would like full text and/or peer reviewed articles underneath the search bar. If you need some search tips, click the link on the right hand side also underneath the search bar. To begin with a basic search, insert specific keywords in the search bar to begin and press enter.

 


 

If you have a specific search, select advanced search on the top left hand corner. Select it, and a page that offers lots of different options opens. There, you can fill in specific details such as keywords, publication dates, people, subject, location, source type, document type, and language.

 

 


 

After you search, the results should pop up. You can sort the search results by oldest or newest using the dropdown bar on the left. Underneath that, you can limit your search results by type, date, publication type, subject, company, location, person, language, and database. At the top of the search on the right hand side, there are links to cite, email, print, and save any specific articles that may be helpful in your research.

Once you find an article that you think will aid you in your search, click the title. Under the title in the new screen, you can choose the tab to give you specific details about the article like the author, publication, volume, issue, page, year, and publisher. On the right is a button that you can download the article. Underneath that, is the same options to cite, email, print, and save this specific article. Beneath that is related articles that may also be useful to you.

 

Good luck on your research!

Statista

Statista is one of the leading statistics companies on the internet. With a team of over 250 statisticians, database experts, analysts, and editors, Statista provides users with an innovative and intuitive tool for researching quantitative data, statistics and related information. The product is aimed at business clients and academics of any size. Consultant firms and media agencies license our services as well as strategy and marketing departments in large corporations from a variety of industries. Our client base includes a wide range of globally active companies and premier academic institutions. Since the launch of the platform in 2008, more than 1,000,000 users have registered with Statista. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open Statista, you can begin your search using the search bar. Beneath it, you can also choose what category you would like to search.

 

 

When you input your search, your results will show up in a list. On the left is a way to limit your results by type. You can also organize your results via the drop down menus above the list. When you find a statistic you think would be useful, select the title.

 

Once you select the title, you will be able to see the source page. On the left will be the statistics, on the right will be you will be able to download the source in multiple formats, create a citation, edit the graph type, and share on social media. Below will be related statistics. At the very bottom it allows you to be able to search by related keywords.

 

 

 

Teacher Reference Center

Teacher Reference Center provides indexing and abstracts of 280 primarily peer-reviewed periodicals covering Assessment, Best Practices, Continuing Education, Current Pedagogical Research, Curriculum Development, Elementary Education, Higher Education, Instructional Media, Language Arts, Literacy Standards, School Administration, Science & Mathematics, and Teacher Education. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open Teacher Reference Center, at the center of the screen is the search bar, where you can begin your search. Using concise keywords allows for more accurate results. Underneath the search bar is the option for an “Advanced Search.” This is suggested if there is something specific you are looking for. If you click “Advanced Search,” there are the options to limit the search. Press search when you’re done.

 

 


 

Once you press search, the search results will appear. Again, on the left you can choose to limit your search. On the right, you can organize your search results by oldest, newest, author, or relevance. Find a source you think is useful and select the title.

 

 

Once you click the title, the source’s page appears. There, it gives you the metadata of the source. To the right, there is a toolbar that holds some options for you. You can add the source to your google drive, a folder, print it, email, save, cite, export, create notes for your research, a link to this page, and the option to share the source.

 

 

Good luck on your research!

The Global Jukebox

The Global Jukebox was created by Alan Lomax, who made it his lifelong mission to archive and share traditional music from around the world. He spent decades in the field, recording heralded artists like Muddy Waters and Woody Guthrie, as well as far more obscure musicians, from the British Isles to Haiti. He also created systems to classify this music and explore the links between cultures. Lomax died in 2002, but the organization he founded, the Association for Cultural Equity (ACE), is hoping to further his research with the Global Jukebox, a new online database. The project, an interactive website, allows users to listen to and learn about more than 6,000 songs from 1,000 cultures — including many from Lomax’s personal collection. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open up The Global Jukebox, it will give you two options. You can either begin by selecting to search by geography or by culture.

 

 

If you select by geography, you will be sent to a map with a menu on the left. If you would like to read about The Global Jukebox, use the menu. If you want to continue your search, select a geographical location on the map. At the left will be cultures and songs from that region. Click on them to listen to the songs. At the top left you can zoom in and out.

 

 

If you wish to select via culture, you will be sent to a wheel, organized by geographical locations. Click on a section to open up the list of cultures and songs from said culture. Click on the name to listen to the songs.

 

US History in Contact

US History in Contact is aligned to state and national curriculum standards, U.S. History In Context provides a complete overview of our nation’s past that covers the most-studied events, decades, conflicts, wars, political and cultural movements, and people. Comprehensive, contextual, media-rich information is provided on topics ranging from the arrival of Vikings in North America, to the stirrings of the revolution, through to the Civil Rights movement, 9/11, and the War on Terror. An always-intuitive experience supports the development of critical thinking and information literacy skills. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open US History in Contact, you can begin your search by using the search bar at the top of the page. To the right of the search bar is the option for Advanced Search if you are looking for something specific. If you are unsure of what you are looking for, you can browse topics.

 

 

Your result should appear. Quick facts on the left, description in the center, and quick links to the different sections down the page. If you are interested in a particular section, click the title.

 

 

When you select a section, a list of sources will appear. You can choose to sort your results or narrow them down on the left. To the left of each source will be a marker to notate the difficulty of that particular source. On the right of each source will tell you what kind of source it is. If there is a source that you deem useful, select the title.

 

 

Selecting a title will send you to its own source page. At the top, you can make the text larger and smaller. You will have the option to listen to the source. You also have a toolbar to the right that holds the ability to to cite, highlight and note, send to the google drive, send to OneDrive, print, email, download, save, and share the source. At the very bottom is a citation and related sources.

 

 

Women and Social Movements in the US

Women and Social Movements in the US is a resource for students and scholars of U.S. history and U.S. women’s history. Organized around the history of women in social movements in the U.S. between 1600 and 2000, this collection seeks to advance scholarly debates and understanding about U.S. women’s history generally and at the same time make those insights accessible to teachers and students at universities, colleges, and high schools. The collection currently includes 122 document projects and archives with 4,900 documents and more than 168,000 pages of additional full-text documents, written by more than 2,600 primary authors. It also includes book, film, and website reviews, notes from the archives, and teaching tools. You can access it via the Curry Library Website.

 

When you open it up, you can begin your search using the search bar at the top right hand corner. Use concise keywords for more accurate results. If you are unsure of what you’re looking for, you can browse by subject and type using the menu bar and on the left hand side. If you want some tips, there are links under the search bar.

 

When you input your search, your results will appear in a list. At the top, you can choose to limit your results using the drop down menu. You can also sort your results by clicking the links in the right hand corner. Once you find something you think will be useful, click the title.

 

 

When you click the title, you will be sent to the source page. At the top right hand corner you can print the document. Under the name, there is a link to see the metadata of the source. Below is a summary as well as a search bar if you need to search within the document. There will also be a link to the document.